350 Miami-Dade girls to get taste of tech and entrepreneurship

BY NANCY DAHLBERG
ndahlberg@miamiherald.com

The nonprofit CODeLLA, AT&T and the University of Miami Center for Computational Science are teaming up to help inspire the next generation of female innovators.

Nearly 350 Miami-Dade County girls, ages 9-17, will connect with female technology leaders, learn about STEM paths and participate in interactive workshops at the all-day She Innovates Tech conference at the Donna E. Shalala Student Center at the University of Miami on Saturday. The conference also includes a She Tech Miami app competition focused on creating a solution to a health-related problem experienced by the elderly.

As part of its Digital You initiative to help people navigate the digital world safely, AT&T employees will lead a plenary session that addresses new technologies for communication and the challenges they present. Employees will share their career paths and have open dialogue with students about digital citizenship. Alicia Abella, AT&T’s assistant vice president of Cloud Technologies and Services and a President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics board member, is keynote speaker for the event.


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OPEN Washington DC isn’t just for South Asian entrepreneurs anymore

At its core, OPEN Washington DC is a “platform for connecting people,” says President Farooq Cheema. And the D.C.-based chapter of this global nonprofit entrepreneurship network has been “connecting people” for 10 years now.

Specifically, during those 10 years, these people have primarily been members of the immigrant South Asian community — individuals who face a specific set of challenges when starting a business. Cheema himself told Technical.ly that he joined OPEN, initially, for the community component — to meet people who understood the issues he faced on a day-to-day basis.

But now, a decade in, OPEN Washington DC is working to expand its audience.

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The LAB Miami, a co-working pioneer, to expand entrepreneur programs

The LAB Miami, one of South Florida’s co-working pioneers, on Tuesday announced expansion plans that include the launch of two entrepreneurship programs and a new CEO. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is investing $1.1 million to support The LAB’s evolution.

With the new funding, The LAB Miami will launch a venture builder called LAB.Ventures, which will work with entrepreneurs, engineers and designers to test and build promising business ideas. The program aims to incubate several technology startups by 2019, the majority of which will be run by women and minorities. The LAB Miami announced it will also launch LAB.ID, which will use educational, community programming to encourage greater collaboration between startups and established businesses.


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Building entrepreneurs: Where Endeavor sees progress in year 3

BY NANCY DAHLBERG
ndahlberg@miamiherald.com

High-growth companies are “believed to create nearly all net new jobs,” although they make up a minority of companies in the U.S., according to a 2011 study for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy.

Developing a strong support system for helping increase sales at already-growing small businesses with proven business models can do more for economic development than promoting startups or luring large corporations with tax breaks, a recent Bloomberg Business article noted. Yet in Miami this year, the metropolitan area ranked No. 2 in the nation among major metro areas for small-business creation but second from last (no. 39) for growth, analyses by the Kauffman Foundation found.


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DC Millennial Week offers job fair, entrepreneur workshops

WASHINGTON — Millennial Week is underway in D.C. to promote entrepreneurship, innovation and career development for the youngest generation of working adults.

“We kicked things off with a ‘students for social change’ event,” said Natalie Moss, founding director of D.C.’s Millennial Week. “We engaged area college students to come up with ways to solve things related to food deserts and food waste in the District.”

The millennial generation, as defined by Moss, includes anyone born between 1980 and 1995.

Tuesday’s Millennial Week Hiring Fair at Arena Stage brought together more than 700 applicants and nearly 30 employers and organizations with specialties including the tech, health care and financial industries.

“Millennials have a pretty high unemployment rate,” Moss said.

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